ASVAB Tips

ASVAB Tips & ASVAB Strategies:

The Two Essential Steps to Acing Your ASVAB Test

So you are planning to take the ASVAB test… It’s a tough test.

Yet if you want to join the military, whether it’s the Army, the Navy or the Marines, you won’t get around it. Not only that, but the better you do, the better your chances that you get the assignment you want. So what to do? You just have to find a way to ace your ASVAB test.

And there is really only one way to pass the ASVAB test, and it involves mastering the two major components: input and output. Seriously. Any ASVAB study guide worth its money has to help you do the following:

1) Get the information into your head
2) Be able to retrieve it during the test

Let’s take a look at each of them in turn.

1) Get the information into your head

In order to ace the ASVAB exam, you must get the information they’re testing into your head. That will take lots of studying — and practice. Sorry, there really are no short-cuts.

But you also want to make sure that you’re not studying harder than necessary, or worse, wasting your time. You do that by making sure you’re doing the following:

Get the correct information!

If you study without clear direction, you may end up spending a lot of time, and maybe even money, yet you may still flunk the test. You need materials that are up to date and help you learn the kinds of things you’re need to know come test-taking time.

How to study

Once you have the correct information, you need to study. People differ in how they like to study, but here are some general guidelines:

Schedule lots of short study periods and take breaks between them

Schedule half hour or one hour segments and then do something else. You might even take a nap, go for a walk, or something else that might be relaxing.

Your brain needs time to process the information you just added.

Schedule practice time as well as review time

Once you have studied something, you need to practice and review it, repeatedly. You want your brain to realize that this info is important and to keep it handy so you’ll be able to retrieve it when you take your ASVAB test.

2) Be able to retrieve the informationl during the test

Part two is to do well during the test. All the studying in the world won’t help you unless you’re able to retrieve what you studied while you’re taking the test.

So how can you improve your chances that the information will be there when you need it?

Here’s the number one rule:

Stay Calm

I know, this may be easier said than done. But if you want to ace the test, you must stay calm. That’s because if you get stressed, your stress hormones will keep your brain from operating effectively, and you’ll have trouble accessing the information you have stored in it.

But how do you stay calm in view of the importance of this test?

Think about it: you know what you know. Your job is to answer as many questions as possible with the information you actually have. Chances are that if you do that you’ll be fine.

What if you discover that there are questions about things you didn’t study?

Here’s the scoop on that: Any information you missed when you were studying is not available to you during the test. Just accept it and move on to the info you do know. And remind yourself of the following:

No amount of stressing will make that information miraculously appear in your brain. It’s not going to happen.

This means that being stressed during the test will serve no useful purpose at all. None!

So take a deep breath and go back to focusing on the questions you can answer. That’s your job. And one question at a time, you’ll make it all the way through..

If you studied the right material, and you stay calm during your test, chances are excellent that you’ll pass the ASVAB test.

So how do you figure out WHAT to study?

CLICK HERE for your FREE Guide to Acing the ASVAB test.

And be sure to check out my review of this ASVAB practice test resource center.

And if you’re ready for the real thing and want to practice your ASVAB test online, CLICK HERE

I’ll keep my fingers crossed!

Elisabeth Kuhn, Ph.D.

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